Thursday, 13 December 2012

Canon EF 24-70mm f/4 L IS USM Preview

 

Preview based on a pre-production Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM
Back in September Canon introduced the EOS 6D, its entry into the nascent 'compact, lightweight' full frame SLR segment. With the launch of the EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM, Canon has now revealed what's destined to be its 'kit' lens. The newcomer is relatively compact in size to match the ethos of the 6D body design, but sports the company's premium 'L' series designation. However this comes with a price tag that's sure to make more than a few Canon users catch their breath - we've been told the the RRP will be $1499 / £1499.99 / €1459. What remains to be seen, though, is how much it will cost in a kit with the 6D body.
The 24-70mm f/4 includes one relatively unusual feature - a macro mode offering up to 0.7x magnification, which is accessed by pulling forward the zoom lock switch and rotating the zoom ring past the 70mm mark. This is complemented by Canon's 'Hybrid IS' that's specifically designed to give better performance for close-up work than conventional IS systems (which tend to be ineffective for macro work). Overall this should add useful extra capability compared to most other standard zooms.
Aside from that, the specification is much as we'd expect from a premium Canon optic. The lens is dust- and splash-resistant, including a rubber seal around the mount. It incorporates a ring-type ultrasonic motor for fast, silent autofocusing, and offers full-time manual focus. The aperture uses a nine-bladed circular iris for attractive rendition of blurred backgrounds, and the front element has a fingerprint-resistant 'fluorine' coating. On paper at least, this all looks like an attractive package.

Headline features

  • 24-70mm focal length; constant f/4 maximum aperture
  • Macro mode with 0.7x magnification
  • 'Hybrid IS' optical image stabilization - 4 stops for normal shooting, 2.5 stops for macro
  • Dust- and splash-proof design
  • EF mount for APS-C and full frame Canon SLRs (and EOS M via Mount adapter EF-EOS M)

Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM specifications

 Maximum format size35mm full frame
 Focal length 24-70mm
 35mm equivalent focal length (APS-C) 38-112mm
 Diagonal angle of view  84° - 34°
 Maximum aperture F4
 Minimum aperture F22
 Lens Construction • 15 elements in 12 groups
 • 2 UD glass elements
 Number of diaphragm blades 9, rounded
 Minimum focus • 0.38m / 1.2ft (normal)
 • 0.20m / 0.7ft (macro)
 Maximum magnification • Approx. 0.7x
 AF motor type • Ring-type Ultrasonic Motor
 Focus method Internal
 Zoom method Rotary, extending barrel
 Image stabilization • Hybrid IS
 • 4 stops (normal shooting)
 • 2.5 stops (macro mode)
 Filter thread • 77mm
 • Does not rotate on focus
 Supplied accessories* • Front and rear caps
 • EW-83L Lens hood
 • LP1219 soft pouch
 Weight 600g (21.2 oz)
 Dimensions 83.4mm diameter x 93mm length
 (3.3 x 3.7 in)
 Lens Mount Canon EF

Thursday, 29 November 2012

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 specification

 



Price
MSRP$2,800
Body type
Body typeCompact
Sensor
Max resolution6000 x 4000
Other resolutions6000 x 3376, 3936 x 2624, 3936 x 2216, 2640 x 1760, 2640 x 1488
Image ratio w:h3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels24.3 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors24.7 megapixels
Sensor sizeFull frame (35.8 x 23.8 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Color spacesRGB, AdobeRGB
Color filter arrayRGB Primary color
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600
White balance presets9
Custom white balanceYes (1)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • RAW (ARW2.3 Format)
  • RAW+JPEG
  • JPEG
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)35 mm
Optical zoom1×
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Face Detection
Autofocus assist lampYes, built -in LED type
Digital zoomYes (14x)
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range25 cm (9.84")
Number of focus points25
Lens mountNone
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3"
Screen dots1,229,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeXtra FineTFT LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeNone
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program Auto
  • Aperture Priority
  • Shutter Priority
  • Manual
  • MR (Memory Recall) 1 / 2 / 3
  • Movie
  • Sweep shooting
  • Scene Selection
  • Intelligent Auto
Scene modes
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Sports
  • Sunset
  • Night Portrait
  • Night Scene
  • Hand-held Twilight
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range6 m
External flashNo
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Slow Sync
Drive modes
  • Single-frame advance
  • Continuous advance
  • Continuous adv Priority AE
  • Speed Priority Continuous
  • Self-timer
  • Self Portrait Self-timer
  • Continuous Self-timer
Continuous driveYes (2.5, 5 fps)
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 EV (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing(3 frames at 1/3 EV, 2/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Format
  • MPEG-4
  • AVCHD
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 25, 24 fps), 1440 x 1080 (30, 25 fps), 1280 x 720 (30 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25 fps)
Videography notesAVCHD: 28M PS (1920×1080, 60p/50p), 24M FX (1920×1080, 60i/50i), 17M FH (1920×1080, 60i/50i), 24M FX (1920×1080, 24p/25p), 17M FH (1920×1080, 24p/25p)
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC, Memory Stick Duo/Pro Duo/Pro-HG Duo
Connectivity
USBUSB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini)
WirelessEye-Fi Connected
Remote controlNo
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion NP-BX1 battery and charger
Battery Life (CIPA)330
Weight (inc. batteries)482 g (1.06 lb / 17.00 oz)
Dimensions113 x 65 x 70 mm (4.45 x 2.56 x 2.76")
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingNo
GPSNone

canon EOS 5D Mark III V/s Canon EOS6D camparison

 
5D Mark III
6D
Announced
3/2012
9/2012
Format
Full-frame
Full-frame
Resolution
22 MP
20 MP
Maximum Resolution
5,760 x 3,840
5,472 x 3,648
Frame Rate
6 FPS
4.5 FPS
Silent Mode
Yes, 3 FPS
Yes, 3 FPS
Electronic lens correction
yes
yes
Storage
CF + SD
one SD only
UHS-1 card compatible?
no
yes
Programmable "C" modes
C1, C2 and C3
C1 and C2
Play, zoom and delete buttons
left side
right side
Finder Magnification
71%
71%
Finder Coverage
100%
97%
Interchangeable focus screens?
no
yes
Switchable finder grid?
Yes
No, use Live View or optional Eg-D screen.
Finder Apparent Angle
34.1º
33.3º
LCD
3.2"
1,040k dots
3"
1,040k dots
LCD auto brightness control?
Yes
no
Anti-reflection coated LCD?
Yes
Yes
LCD cover
Glass
plastic
M-Fn button by shutter
yes
no
ISO normal
100 ~ 25,600
100 ~ 25,600
ISO with L- and H+ values
50 ~ 102,400
50 ~ 102,400
Maximum movie ISO
12,800
12,800
Battery
LP-E6
LP-E6
Shots per charge
950
1,090
Top shutter speed
1/8,000
1/4,000
Sync Speed
1/200
1/180
Flash exposure
E-TTL II
E-TTL II
AF Points
61
11
Center AF point works as dark as
LV -2
LV -3
AF Fine Tuning
yes
yes
AF Fine Tuning settings
both ends of zoom
both ends of zoom
AF tune by serial numbers?
yes
yes
Light meter segments
63 zone, 2 color
63 zone, 2 color
Electronic Level
yes
yes
Multiple Exposures
yes
yes**
HDR
yes
yes**
GPS
no, needs $390 GP-E2.
yes
WiFi for both images and remote control
no, needs $775 EFT-E7A
yes
Top cover
Magnesium alloy
plastic
Body frame
Magnesium alloy
Magnesium alloy
Clock battery
CR1616 throw-away
Internal lifetime automatic rechargeable
Size
6.0 x 4.6 x 3.0"
152 x 116 x 76mm
5.7 x 4.4 x 2.8"
144 x 110 x 71mm
Weight w/ card and battery
33.7 oz.
956 g.
26.7 oz.
755 g.
Price, 9/2012
$3,459
$2,099

* Ignore this: if you wear out the shutter in a year it should be covered under warranty, and if you ever wear it out, replacing a shutter is usually only costs a couple of hundred dollars!
** JPG only. 5D Mark III also does thing in ra

Monday, 24 September 2012

Compare Blackmagic Cinema Camera Products

 
blackmagiccinemacamera.jpg

blackmagiccinemacamera.png

Dramatically speed up the whole post production process with Blackmagic Cinema Camera

formats.jpg

Open File Formats

Blackmagic Cinema Camera uses standard file formats, so you don’t need to wait years for your video software to support the media! Recording native 2.5K resolution uses the open CinemaDNG format, so you get full 12-bit RAW recording quality using the built-in SSD recorder, and the benefit of industry wide compatibility. For even greater compatibility you can also choose 1080HD recording into ProRes and DNxHD compressed video formats. Blackmagic Cinema Camera is the only camera to support purely open file formats!
metadata.jpg

Fast Metadata Entry

Logging file metadata directly into the camera dramatically speeds up the post production process. With the Blackmagic Cinema Camera 'slate' you can enter information such as shot number, search tags, scene number, timecode and more! You can even set shot number and other data to increment automatically! Metadata is compatible with leading editing software and is fully searchable so when you're editing your project you can avoid the time consuming task of searching for specific shots!
ultrascope.jpg

Includes UltraScope

Blackmagic UltraScope provides technically accurate waveform monitoring with a beautifully designed computer interface. Connect Blackmagic Cinema Camera to any compatible computer using Thunderbolt technology to display 6 live scope views on a single monitor! Use UltraScope on set or in any location for Parade, Waveform, Vectorscope and Histogram signal measurement. UltraScope includes picture view, audio level and phase monitoring!
davinciresolve.jpg

Includes DaVinci Resolve

Blackmagic Cinema Camera includes full DaVinci Resolve 9.0 software for Mac and Windows, so you get more color correction features that let you take advantage of Blackmagic Cinema Camera’s amazing image quality. Shoot wide dynamic range images and then make color correction decisions in post production. You will never be limited creatively by your equipment because you have the same camera and color correction technology used by the world’s leading cinematographers!

 
Blackmagic Cinema Camera EF
Blackmagic Cinema Camera MFT
Camera Features
Active Sensor Resolution2432 x 13662432 x 1366
Raw Resolution12-bit RAW files recorded at 2432 x 136612-bit RAW files recorded at 2432 x 1366
Shooting Resolutions2.5K RAW at 2432 x 1366.
ProRes and DNxHD at 1920 x 1080
2.5K RAW at 2432 x 1366.
ProRes and DNxHD at 1920 x 1080
Frame Rates23.98p, 24p, 25p, 29.97p, 30p23.98p, 24p, 25p, 29.97p, 30p
Active Sensor Size15.81mm x 8.88mm15.81mm x 8.88mm
Dynamic Range13 stops13 stops
FocusFocus button turns on peakingFocus button turns on peaking
Iris ControlIris button automatically adjusts the lens iris settings so no pixel is clippedCompatible with any manually operated iris based lens
Lens MountEF and ZE mount compatible with electronic iris controlPassive Micro Four Thirds mount for manually operated lens with manual iris control. Compatible with most third party MFT adapters for other lens mounts such as PL etc.
Screen Dimensions5" and 800 x 480 resolution5" and 800 x 480 resolution
Screen TypeIntegrated LCD capacitive touchscreenIntegrated LCD capacitive touchscreen
Metadata SupportAutomatic camera data and user data such as shot number, filenames and keywordsAutomatic camera data and user data such as shot number, filenames and keywords
ControlsOnscreen touch menus and physical buttons for recording and transport controlOnscreen touch menus and physical buttons for recording and transport control
MicrophoneIntegrated mono microphoneIntegrated mono microphone
SpeakerIntegrated mono speakerIntegrated mono speaker
Mounting Options3 x 1/4"-20 UNC thread mounting points on top of camera.
1 x 1/4"-20 UNC thread tripod mount with locator pin.
3 x 1/4"-20 UNC thread mounting points on top of camera.
1 x 1/4"-20 UNC thread tripod mount with locator pin.
PowerIntegrated Lithium-ion Polymer rechargeable battery.
12V-30V DC port for external battery power or use included 12V AC adapter.
Integrated Lithium-ion Polymer rechargeable battery.
12V-30V DC port for external battery power or use included 12V AC adapter.
Battery LifeApproximately 90 minutesApproximately 90 minutes
Battery Charge TimeApproximately 2 hours when not in use. Approximately 2 hours when not in use.
Camera Dimensions166.2mm by 113.51mm x 126.49mm excluding detachable sunshade and turret dust cap166.2mm by 113.51mm x 126.49mm excluding detachable sunshade and turret dust cap
Camera Weight1.7 kg / 3.75 lb1.5 kg / 3.3 lb
Storage Features
Storage TypeRemovable 2.5” SSDRemovable 2.5” SSD
Storage FormatMac OS Extended format. SSDs can be formatted on any Mac or use Mediafour MacDrive (not included) on a Windows PC.Mac OS Extended format. SSDs can be formatted on any Mac or use Mediafour MacDrive (not included) on a Windows PC.
Storage Rates5 MB/frame in RAW 2.5K fits about 30 minutes of 24p video on a 256 GB solid state disk. Compressed HD formats fit more than 5 times the amount of RAW video.5 MB/frame in RAW 2.5K fits about 30 minutes of 24p video on a 256 GB solid state disk. Compressed HD formats fit more than 5 times the amount of RAW video.
Uncompressed Recording FormatsRAW 2.5K CinemaDNGRAW 2.5K CinemaDNG
Compressed Recording FormatsApple ProRes and Avid DNxHD. All compressed recording in 1920x1080 10-bit YUV with choice of Film or Video Dynamic Range.Apple ProRes and Avid DNxHD. All compressed recording in 1920x1080 10-bit YUV with choice of Film or Video Dynamic Range.
Connections
SDI Video Output1 x 10-bit HD-SDI 4:2:2 with choice of Film or Video Dynamic Range1 x 10-bit HD-SDI 4:2:2 with choice of Film or Video Dynamic Range
Analog Audio Input2 x 1/4” jacks for professional balanced analog audio, switchable between mic and line levels.2 x 1/4” jacks for professional balanced analog audio, switchable between mic and line levels.
Analog Audio Output1 x 3.5mm stereo headphone output1 x 3.5mm stereo headphone output
SDI Audio Output4 channels in HD-SDI4 channels in HD-SDI
Remote Control1 x 2.5mm LANC for Rec Start/Stop, Iris Control and Focus Control1 x 2.5mm LANC for Rec Start/Stop, Iris Control and Focus Control
Computer InterfaceThunderbolt port for capture of RAW video and audio.
USB 2.0 mini B port for software updates and configuration.
Thunderbolt port for capture of RAW video and audio.
USB 2.0 mini B port for software updates and configuration.
External Power12V-30V DC port for external battery power or use included 12V AC adapter.12V-30V DC port for external battery power or use included 12V AC adapter.
Standards
SDI ComplianceSMPTE 292M.SMPTE 292M.
SDI Audio Sampling48 kHz and 24 bit.48 kHz and 24 bit.
Extras
Software IncludedDaVinci Resolve grading software including Resolve USB dongle for Mac OS X and Windows.
Media Express software for video capture from the camera’s Thunderbolt port.
Blackmagic UltraScope software for waveform monitoring from the camera’s Thunderbolt port.
DaVinci Resolve grading software including Resolve USB dongle for Mac OS X and Windows.
Media Express software for video capture from the camera’s Thunderbolt port.
Blackmagic UltraScope software for waveform monitoring from the camera’s Thunderbolt port.
AccessoriesDetachable sun shield, camera strap, turret dust cap and 12V AC adapter.Detachable sun shield, camera strap, turret dust cap and 12V AC adapter.
Product Warranty12 Month Limited Manufacturer's Warranty.12 Month Limited Manufacturer's Warranty.
Optional Accessories
Camera HandlesBlackmagic Cinema Camera HandlesBlackmagic Cinema Camera Handles

Saturday, 22 September 2012

46.1 MP Canon EOS-3D X to be announced before PhotoPlus ?


The Canon EOS-3D X has rumored for a long time, there are more new rumors about this big megapixel EOS. This EOS-3D X will use a 46.1 MP sensor.

Rumors said this Canon EOS-3D will be previewed at PhotoPlus 2012 in New York City between October 24 – October 27, 2012.
Here are some rumored specs about this camera:
  • 46.1 MP
  • 5 frame per second
  • Dual DIGIC 5+
  • ISO: 50 – 12800
  • 16 bit
  • AF: Same as 1DX
  • USB 3
  • CF+SD

Monday, 17 September 2012

Canon EOS 6D Vs. 5D Mark II Vs. 7D Specs Comparison


Here is a full specifications comparison for Canon EOS 6D, Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Canon EOS 7D. Take a look below:
Feature5D Mark IIEOS 6DEOS 7D
Sensor Resolution21.0 Million20.2 Million18.0 Million
Sensor TypeCMOSCMOSCMOS
Sensor Size36x24mm35.8×23.9mm22.3 x 14.9 mm
Sensor TypeFull FrameFull FrameAPS-C
Dust Reduction / Sensor CleaningYesYesYes
Image Size5616 x 37445472 x 36485184 x 3456
Image ProcessorDIGIC 4DIGIC 5+Dual Digic 4
Viewfinder TypePentaprismPentaprismPentaprism
Viewfinder Coverage98%97%100%
Viewfinder Magnification0.71x0.71x1x
Storage MediaCompact Flash (Type I or II), UDMA, MicrodriveSD/SDHC/SDXCCompact Flash (Type I or II), UDMA, Microdrive cards
Continuous Shooting Speed3.9 FPS4.5 FPS8 FPS
Max Shutter Speed1/8000 to 30 sec1/4000 to 30 sec1/8000 to 30 sec
Shutter Durability150,000100,000150,000
Native ISO SensitivityISO 100-6,400ISO 100-25,600ISO 100-6,400
Boosted ISO SensitivityISO 50, ISO 12,800-25,600ISO 50, ISO 51,200-102,400ISO 12,800
Autofocus System9 points11 points19 points
Built-in Wi-FiNoYesNo
Built-in GPSNoYesNo
Video OutputH.264H.264H.264
Video Maximum Resolution1920 x 1080 (30 fps)1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 23.976 fps fps)1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps)
LCD Size3″ Fixed TFT-LCD3.2″ Fixed TFT-LCD3″ Fixed TFT-LCD
LCD Resolution920,000 dots1,040,000 dots920,000 dots
Touch ScreenNoYesNo
Exposure Compensation±2 EV (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)±5 EV (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)±5 EV (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
Bracketing±2 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)±3 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)±3 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
HDR SupportNoYesNo
BatteryLP-E6 Lithium-ion BatteryLP-E6 Lithium-ion BatteryLP-E6 Lithium-ion Battery
Battery Life850 shots (CIPA)900 shots (CIPA)800 shots (CIPA)
USB Version2.02.02.0
Dimensions152 x 114 x 75 mm145 x 111 x 71 mm148 x 111 x 74 mm
Weight850g770g860g
MSRP Price$1,899$2,099$1,499

EOS 6D sample images / Photos taken with EOS 6D


Shooting Mode:
Aperture-priority AE
Tv (Shutter Speed):
1/250 sec
Av (Aperture Value):
f/3.2
ISO Speed:
ISO200
Lens:
EF135mm f/2L USM
White Balance:
AWB
Picture Style:
Neutral
ISO speed is based on recommended exposure index.
Shooting Mode:
Aperture-priority AE
Tv (Shutter Speed):
1/80 sec
Av (Aperture Value):
f/8.0
ISO Speed:
ISO100
Lens:
EF17-40mm f/4L USM
White Balance:
Daylight
Picture Style:
Standard
ISO speed is based on recommended exposure index.
This JPEG image is processed by in-camera RAW processing from a RAW image with a EOS 6D.

Shooting Mode:
Aperture-priority AE
Tv (Shutter Speed):
1/250 sec
Av (Aperture Value):
f/3.5
ISO Speed:
ISO400
Lens:
EF40mm f/2.8 STM
White Balance:
AWB
Picture Style:
Portrait
ISO speed is based on recommended exposure index.

Key specs compared to EOS 5D Mark III and Nikon D600 and canon 6D

In the table below we see how some of the EOS 6D's key specs measure up against its more expensive big brother, the 5D Mark III, and its main rival the Nikon D600.
 
Canon EOS 6D
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Nikon D600
 Effective Pixels • 20.2 MP • 22.3 MP • 24.3 MP
 ISO Range • 100-25600 standard
 • 50-102800 expanded
 • 100-25600 standard
 • 50-102800 expanded
 • 100-6400 standard
 • 50-25600 expanded
 No of AF points • 11 • 61 • 39
 Screen • 3.2"
 • 1,040,000 dots
 • 3.2"
 • 1,040,000 dots
 • 3.2"
 • 921,000 dots
 Viewfinder • 97% coverage
 • 0.71x magnification
 • 100% coverage
 • 0.71x magnification
 • 100% coverage
 • 0.7x magnification
 Built-in flash •  No • No •  Yes
 Continuous drive • 4.5 fps • 6 fps • 5.5 fps
 Storage • SD • Compact flash
 • SD
 • SD
 • 2 slots
 Weight
 (inc batteries)
 • 770g (1.7 lb) • 950g (2.1 lb) • 850g (1.9 lb)
 Dimensions • 145 x 111 x 71 mm
   (5.7 x 4.4 x 2.8")
 • 152 x 116 x 76 mm
   (6.0 x 4.6 x 3.0")
 • 141 x 113 x 82 mm
   (5.6 x 4.5 x 3.2")
 Wi-Fi + GPS •  Built-in •  Optional •  Optional

Sunday, 16 September 2012

Canon EOS 6D Official Specifications

 

Canon EOS 6D Official Specs
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Sensor
Image ratio w:h3:2
Effective pixels20.2 megapixels
Sensor sizeFull frame (36 x 24 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDigic 5+
Image
ISOAuto, 100 – 25600 in 1/3 stops, plus 50, 51200, 102400 as option
White balance presets6
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points11
Lens mountCanon EF mount
Focal length multiplier
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2″
Screen dots102,400
Touch screenYes
Screen typeClear View II TFT LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage97 %
Viewfinder magnification0.71×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Aperture priorityYes
Shutter priorityYes
Manual exposure modeYes
Subject / scene modesYes
Built-in flashNo
External flashYes (Hot shoe)
Continuous driveYes (4.5 fps)
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Partial
Exposure compensation±5 EV (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±3 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis)
Videography features
Format
  • H.264
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 23.976 fps fps), 1280 x 720 (59.94, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (25, 30 fps)
Videography notes1080 and 720 intra or inter frame, 480 inter frame
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USBUSB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (HDMI Mini)
WirelessBuiltIn
Remote controlYes (Remote control with N3 type contact, Wireless Controller LC-5, Remote Controller RC-6)
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Splash and dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion LP-E6 rechargeable battery & charger
Weight (inc. batteries)770 g (1.70 lb / 27.16 oz)
Dimensions145 x 111 x 71 mm (5.71 x 4.37 x 2.8″)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes (by cable and PC)
GPSBuiltIn
GPS notesImage tagging and tracking modes

Friday, 14 September 2012

Canon EOS 6D Specs Leaked?

 

Canon EOS 6D Specs Leaked?
Canon EOS 6D Specs?I received this spec list this morning, and it seems to have also appeared at Digicame-info.
  • A new 20mp sensor
  • Full Frame
  • 4.5fps
  • ISO Range 100-25600
  • DIGIC5+
  • APS-C Sized body
  • Weathersealed
  • SD Card
  • Built-in Wifi & GPS
  • 11 AF Points, f/2.8 Cross-type in the center.
  • 3″ LCD
  • Full HD (1920×1080)
  • Available December 2012
  • Price: $1999 USD Body Only (Speculated price)

Friday, 7 September 2012

Canon EOS 6D Announcement Soon?

Canon EOS 6D Announcement Soon? [CR1]
Canon EOS 6DAnother suggestion that the Canon EOS 6D will be announced soon. It might be announced on a different day than the PowerShot and Pixma announcements early next week.
Specifications
  • 22mp (Same sensor as 5D2)
  • 4.5 fps
  • Touchscreen
  • Same AF system as 7D

Tuesday, 28 August 2012

The World’s Most Expensive Camera Lens

 
The Worlds Most Expensive Camera Lens mostexpensivelens mini
A Leica camera from 1923 became the world’s most expensive camera earlier this year when it was auctioned for a staggering $2.79 million. The world’s most expensive lens has a similar price tag… and is also a Leica.

The Leica APO-Telyt-R 1:5.6/1600mm, pictured above, is a massive telephoto lens that dwarfs any Leica camera that you attach to it. It’s the company’s longest, largest, and heaviest lens.
It was produced as a custom order by one of the world’s wealthiest photography-enthusiasts, Qatari prince Saud bin Muhammed Al Thani, who paid a whopping $2,064,500 for the hefty piece of glass.
That’s not all though. Like any good billionaire photographer would do, Al Thani reportedly purchased a customized four wheel drive Mercedes Benz for the sole purpose of transporting the lens from place to place (the world’s most expensive “camera case”?)
There’s actually a second copy of the lens in existence: a prototype that’s on display at a Leica showroom in Solms, Germany.
While the technical specs of the lens are shrouded in mystery, certain things are known: it’s equipped with a Leica R-mount, it’s approximately 4 feet long, and it weighs at least 132 pounds.
Sadly, it doesn’t appear that there are any sample shots taken with the lens available for pixel peepers, but we’re guessing the shots and the functionality of the lens are similar to the magical Sigma 200-500mm.
(via Geek)

Image credit: Photograph by Leica/MegaPixel

Sunday, 22 July 2012

Canon EOS M System Announced

Canon EOS M System Announced
Put Your Creativity Into Motion With The New EOS M Digital CameraThe Newest Camera in Canon’s Lineup Delivers Exceptional EOS Full HD Video Quality with Continuous Autofocus and an Expansive Selection of Lenses
LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., July 23, 2012 – Combining the perfect blend of advanced video features and excellent still image quality in a convenient size, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the EOS M Digital Camera. Canon has made significant advancements in the realm of professional-quality HD video capture, from advanced CMOS sensor technology to smooth, quiet continuous autofocus. Inspired by EOS technology, the EOS M leverages these core technologies and distills them down to provide outstanding video capture capabilities while retaining high-quality still image capture. When shooting still images, the EOS M camera’s 18-megapixel APS-C-sized CMOS image sensor provides a shallow depth of field, incredible low-light image quality and a wide dynamic range to capture rich gradation and detail.
This new addition to the EOS family offers a great solution to videographers and photographers of all levels, with two new lenses designed specifically for Canon’s new camera format – the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens and the optional EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens– and the ability to use the full line of Canon EF and EF-S lenses through the optional Mount Adapter EF-EOS M.
“The EOS M includes a unique feature set making it an ideal movie-making tool while offering incredible still image quality on its APS-C-sized CMOS sensor. The camera’s size, image quality, advanced video capabilities and the versatility of Canon’s full lineup of lenses make the EOS M another great option to help our customers record and capture their creative vision,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A.
Product Specifications and Features:
• EOS Full HD Movie mode with Movie Servo AF for continuous focus tracking of moving subjects also includes:
• Manual exposure control
• Multiple resolution frame rates
• Built-in stereo microphone
• Manual audio level adjustment
• Video Snapshot mode with touch-screen editing
• 18.0-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor
• ISO 100–6400 (expandable to 12800 in H mode) for video recording, ISO 100 – 12800 (expandable to 25600 in H mode) for still image shooting from bright to dim light and high performance Powerful DIGIC 5 Image Processor for exceptional image quality video and photos
• Hybrid CMOS AF delivers fast autofocus speed for video and photos
• Touch Screen 3.0-inch Clear View LCD monitor II (approximately 1,040,000 dots) with smudge-resistant coating features multi-touch operation allowing photographers to use familiar gestures such as “pinch-to-zoom” and “swiping” to scroll between pictures and Touch AF for an easy and intuitive video capture experience
• Scene Intelligent Auto mode delivers expertly optimized photos and scene detection for amazing results even when shooting at night
• Advanced imaging features like Handheld Night Scene mode, HDR Backlight Control mode, and seven Creative Filters provide added versatility
• Multi-shot Noise Reduction helps preserve precious detail in photos at high ISO speeds
• Compatible with SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards, including new Ultra High Speed (UHS-I) cards
• Compatible with all Canon Speedlite accessories including the new Speedlite 600EX and Speedlite Transmitter ST-E3-RT
• Compatible with Canon’s GPS Receiver GP-E2
An Advanced Video Capture DeviceThe EOS M utilizes Canon’s Hybrid CMOS AF system to deliver fast autofocus speed for both video and photos. The Hybrid CMOS AF system truly shines when shooting video with EOS Full HD Movie mode including Movie Servo AF for continuous autofocus and tracking of moving subjects. The Hybrid CMOS AF system is located on the CMOS sensor itself and combines phase-difference AF and contrast AF to achieve operational stability, speed and precision. The Movie Servo AF function on the EOS M is enabled by default which keeps images on the rear screen in constant focus, even before the shutter is pressed. This continual focus makes for sharp video capture in a snap or to help reduce shutter lag due to focusing when still images want to be shot. The camera employs three AF methods for video and photos, Face Detection & Tracking AF, Multi-Point AF for automatics selection and Single-Point AF, where users select one of 31 AF points. Through the camera’s touch-panel operation, subject recognition and tracking is engaged at the touch of a finger, allowing users to track subjects accurately and focus on intended subjects with ease. In addition to subject tracking, the touch-panel LCD allows for simple, intuitive operation, menu navigation and touch features making it easy to shoot video and photos.
Thanks to Canon’s new Stepping Motor (STM) technology, when using either of the newly announced M-series lenses – the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens or the optional EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens – the AF system remains silent, helping ensure users only capture the sound of the scene being recorded. The EOS M also features manual audio level control to 64 levels, a built-in stereo microphone, which includes a wind filter and an attenuator function to reduce audio distortion in extra loud situations. The EOS M records MPEG-4 AVC H.264 video as an .MOV file in a range of NTSC and PAL professional frame rates, including 1080p Full HD video at 30p (29.97), 24p (23.976) and 25p, 720p HD video at 60p (59.94) or 50p and Standard Definition video at 30p (29.97) or 25p.
In addition to the creativity afforded by over 70 compatible lenses, the EOS M also includes Picture Style settings – including custom Picture Styles – when shooting video, allowing users to adjust color settings the same as when shooting still images. The camera also includes Canon’s Video Snapshot mode for an easy way to record and create a fun highlight reel that can be easily shared. Video Snapshot mode combines a series of short video clips into a single file, all in-camera. Through the camera’s touch-screen controls users can delete, cut or re-order the clips in-camera for quick and easy editing.
Optical Diversity: New M-Series Lenses and AccessoriesAlong with the EOS M, Canon is also introducing two new M-series lenses – with new EOS M mounts –that include STM technology allowing for smooth and silent focusing when paired with Hybrid CMOS AF.
The EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens is ideal for shooting video and still images. The fixed focal length lens has a great capacity for gathering light with an incredible aperture of f/2 and when combined with the camera’s APS-C image sensor, provide beautiful bright images and background blur for both video and stills. For more focal range versatility, Canon is also introducing the new EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM, which provides videographers and photographers with a variable zoom range for general use with video recording or photographing. Both lenses are designed specifically for use with the EOS M digital camera.
In addition to the two lenses, any of Canon’s EF and EF-S lenses can be used with the EOS M with the optional Mount Adapter EF-EOS M. The EOS M camera’s strong magnesium and stainless steel frame provide the durability and rigidity to support the full line of EF and EF-S Lenses in a lightweight convenient design. Using the adapter allows the camera to be fully integrated into the EOS ecosystem of lenses, adding creative options and versatility to this powerful camera.
Ideal for use with the EOS M, Canon is also announcing a new compact and lightweight flash unit, the Speedlite 90EX, designed for the photographer on the go. The Speedlite 90EX is capable of coverage for 24mm wide angle lenses (35mm equivalent) with maximum guide numbers of 30 feet (9 meters) at ISO 100. The flash unit can be controlled wirelessly for creative multiple flash shoots and uses the standard Canon EOS hot shoe mount for compatibility with all EOS DSLR cameras and PowerShot digital cameras that include a hot shoe.
AvailabilityThe EOS M Digital Camera bundled with the new EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens will be available in October for an estimated retail price of $799.99. Also a white version of the EOS M Digital Camera bundled with the new EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens will be exclusively available through the Canon Online store, shop.usa.canon.com.
The new EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens, Mount Adapter EF-EOS M and Speedlite 90EX will all be available in October at an estimated retail price of $299.99, $199.99 and $149.99 respectively.

Canon EOS M with the Canon EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS II

Canon Mirrorless Canon EOS M

Canon EOS M Specs
Canon EOS M SpecificationsThe Canon EOS M that launches tomorrow will have the following specifications. Beyond the camera, the system will launch with 2 lenses, the EF-M 22 f/2 STM & EF-M 18-55 IS. It will also launch with a new flash, the EX 90 and an EF lens adaptor.
  • 18mp APS-C
  • DIGIC V
  • ISO 100-12800 (25,600 Expansion)
  • 3″ Touchscreen 1.04million pixels
  • Phase & Contrast AF
  • Video Servo AF
  • 1920×1080 Video 30p/25p/24p
  • 1280×720 Video 60p/50p
  • MPEG-4, AVC/H.264
  • SD Card
  • Adaptor at launch for EF lenses
Additional specs from [
  • Hand-held Twilight mode, to help with long exposures in low light.
  • Multi-shot noise reduction function that helps reduce the noise by combining four images.
  • The usual creative filters
  • HDR mode to synthesize three different exposures
  • Camera size: 66.5mm (width) 108.6mm (height) x 32.3mm (depth)
  • The weight (body only) 262g, (including battery and memory card) 298g

Friday, 20 July 2012

Robo-Cams at the Olympic Games ?







Photo: Fabrizio Bensch/REUTERS.
Mark Reblias knew as a photographer going to the Olympics that he would have to bring his A-game. Trying to get the best shot against some of the other top sports shooters in the world is one thing, but competing against robots, well, that’s just unsportsmanlike conduct.
At this year’s Olympic games, Reuters, in addition to its army of traditional photographers, will have 11 robots set up in places no shooter would otherwise be able to get. Photographers like Reblias are used to fixed remote-operated camera systems grabbing otherwise difficult shots. However, what Reuters will do is a whole new ball game: Their robotic camera system, armed with Cannon’s newest body, the 1-DX, will have three-axis control and have a photographer at a computer operating its every movement with a joystick.

Developed by Fabrizio Bensch and Pawel Kopczynski, the 11 robo-cams at various venues will use a wide range of lenses: a 24-105mm, a 70-200mm and telephotos up to 400mm. In addition to three axes of movement, the cameras’ pilots control shutter speed, sensitivity and image size. Photos instantly stream into Reuters’ remote editing system, Paneikon, and are moved to clients just minutes after being captured.
Looking for a way to get dramatic shots at new angles, the Berlin-based photographers dreamed up the idea in 2009 and tested a two-axis prototype last year in the World Athletic Championships in Daegu, South Korea. The London Olympics will be the first showing of the three-axis control, and the first time using more than just one robotic camera.
“We are essentially able to put cameras and photographers where they’ve never been before, capturing images in ways they’ve never been captured,” Bensch said. “For example, I’ve installed a robotic camera unit on a truss, 30 meters high — in a position where no photographer has been in a previous Olympics.”
For Reblias, those are positions you just can’t compete against. With the traditional remote-control cameras, if the subject showed untethered joy five feet out of frame, you were out of luck. Now if Reuters is able to get that shot, “well, there’s nothing I can do,” he said. “Maybe I’ll have to upgrade my gear and make a robotic system. It’d be expensive, it might be a cost I have to take on.”
For now, the team will only be using the new 18.1 megapixel Cannon for still photos, despite the 1DX’s ability to shoot high-definition video. Cameras will be set up in venues that Reuters thought would produce the most dramatic shots: table tennis, boxing, taekwondo, judo/wrestling, fencing and weightlifting. The robotic camera system will also be installed in the main Olympic Park for swimming, basketball, gymnastics and athletics.

Canon mirrorless camera ?

Canon EOS MBelow is the new Canon mirrorless camera and EF-M 22mm f/2 Lens.
The folks at [DI] posted what appears to be the first image of the new Canon EOS M mirrorless camera.
 

Monday, 9 July 2012

Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x lens

Full Specifications

Awaited with interest :-)

EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x

Press Info (UK)
Press Release - 7th February 2011, 05:00 GMT
Canon announces development of a new telephoto zoom lens with an integrated extender
United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, 7th February 2011 – Canon today announces the development of a telephoto zoom lens featuring an integrated focal length extender – the EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x The lens will be displayed for the first time during CP+, held in Yokohama, Japan.
Designed for Canon’s leading range of EOS Digital SLR cameras, the new lens will be an ideal addition for sports and wildlife photographers, offering exceptional flexibility with a built-in 1.4x extender that creates an increased focal range of 280 – 560mm.
Perfect for photographers who require high performance, fast aperture and a flexible telephoto range, the EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x will enable photographers to shoot a greater breadth of subjects using a single lens, delivering the best possible image quality at all focal lengths.
Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x lens
Developed as a new addition to Canon’s acclaimed L-series of professional lenses, the new lens will offer an unsurpassed combination of versatility, first-class optical performance and an enhanced weather-proof construction. The model will be released as part of Canon’s continued development of its EF lens line-up, offering enhanced performance and improved functions that cater for the needs of photographers from beginners through to professionals. Built for professional performance
controls for 200-4000 lens

Wednesday, 27 June 2012

Canon EOS 1D X Digital SLR Review

 

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Last week, on June 20, I was one of the lucky few in Japan to receive a phone call to let me know that my Canon EOS 1D X Digital SLR camera was ready to pick up, on the day of its launch. Having spent a lot of time with the camera over the last six days, today we’re going to review this amazing new flagship from Canon.

I should say straight up that because I’m not a sports shooter, you aren’t going to see test shots of athletes running towards me, as is often the case with reviews of the 1D series from Canon. I was able to do some bird photography though, which is another common use of these fast frame rate cameras, so we’ll touch on the results of a couple of bird shoots, as well as some high ISO performance tests, which is another area that I know people are anxious to hear about. First though, let’s take a look at the camera itself, and touch on some of the nice new features.
As we progress, I’ll compare the 1D X with the 5D Mark III, which I own and reviewed in March, and have been using a lot over the three months. I’ll also compare the 1D X to its predecessor the 1D Mark IV sometimes, when that seems more relevant. I sold my 1D Mark IV in part exchange for the 1D X, so I am not able to shoot any comparison shots or show the cameras side by side.

A Beautiful Brick (in a good way!)

Canon EOS 1D X
Canon EOS 1D X
The first thing I noticed when I took the 1D X out of the box was how sleek the 1D X is. The black paint seems courser, in a good way, than the 1D Mark IV, which was a little smoother and shinier. The lines either side of the pentaprism chamber are rounder, and the camera overall just looks and feels more refined. It’s a brick of course, and weighs just over 1.5KG, so if weight is a consideration, this is not the camera for you. If you ever held a 1D Mark IV, it’s about 160g heavier. I personally like the weight of these 1 series cameras. I buy them for their ruggedness, and really just expect them to be on the hefty side.

New Buttons

Externally there are also a number of new buttons. On the front of the camera we now have two depth-of-field preview buttons, so you can use either depending on whether you are holding the camera in landscape or portrait mode. Also, right next to the depth-of-field preview buttons are new Multi-function buttons. There is also a M-fn button close to the Main Dial behind the shutter buttons, so the new Multi-function buttons on the front of the camera are called Multi-function 2 buttons.
Canon EOS 1D X - Multi-function and DoF Preview buttons
Canon EOS 1D X – Multi-function and DoF Preview buttons
The two Multi-function 2 buttons can be configured to do a number of things, and you’ll of course need to make your own selection. For me, at the moment, I’ve configured mine to toggle between One Shot and AI Servo focus. The supertelephoto lenses from Canon have buttons around the front that I always program to do this, so it’s nice to now be able to toggle easily with all of my lenses. So far I’ve found it very useful.

On the Back

On the back of the camera, there is the new Quick Control button. This is also on the 5D Mark III but it was not on the 1D Mark IV. If you press the Quick Control button while the menu is displayed, it will jump to the next menu group, but if you press it when the LCD is off, it will take you into a screen to control the camera. This is useful if you are working on a tripod and can’t easily see the top LCD, because you can change all the major settings from the back LCD from the Quick Control button along with the Multi-controller. There is also now a second Multi-controller that is position for use in portrait mode, which is very welcome.
Canon EOS 1D X Back View
Canon EOS 1D X Back View

Larger LCD

The LCD on the back of the camera is larger at 3.2″, than the 3″ screen on the 1D Mark IV. The 5D Mark III is also 3.2″ but I didn’t notice the increase as much on the 5D3 as I did with the 1D X. It just seems bigger, maybe because there isn’t a line of buttons down the left side like there is on the 5D Mark III.
Also, whereas the small rear LCD panel was directly below the main LCD Monitor on the 1D Mark IV, with the image Playback button to the left, and the Erase button, Function button and Protect/Voice memo buttons below that, on the 1D X, we now have the Playback button, Index/Magnify/Reduce button, Erase button and the Protect/Voice memo buttons in a line below the main LCD Monitor and the small LCD Panel is now below these buttons. There’s a new Card/Image size selection button to the left of the LCD panel, but this really just replaces the Function button on the 1D Mark IV.
You might have noticed that this means the Magnify and Reduce button is now positioned in this group, and not up in the top right as people are used to. This is the same as the 5D Mark III, and was difficult to get used to at first, but you can program the Set button to magnify the image though, and I have done this on my 5D Mark III and 1D X, which I find to be a good workaround.

 Two CF Card Slots!

I was really happy to hear that the 1D X was to have two CF Card slots, and not one CF and one SD card slot. Although CF cards are larger, they are much faster. I put an SD card into my old 1 series bodies, as a spill over, but this was more of an issue when I used 8GB cards. Since I now own two 64GB cards and one 128GB CF card, there was no longer any spill over, and the SD card slot became totally redundant.
Canon EOS 1D X - Two CF Card Slots
Canon EOS 1D X – Two CF Card Slots

Ethernet Port

Another nice addition is the Gigabit Ethernet port for tethered shooting. BUT, and this is a big BUT, Canon decided that the Mac OS was not important enough to update the EOS Utility to support Wired shooting just yet. You can pair the camera with the computer, that part works fine, but EOS Utility doesn’t work. What’s even more frustrating is that all through the Canon documentation, it states that you can use EOS Utility to shoot with the Ethernet connection without any restrictions!
I spent a whole morning trying to get this working, and when I eventually gave in and called support, I was told it was not yet supported. When I asked to see where that was stated publicly, I was lead to a Web page hidden about 5 layers down on the Japan Web site. You’d never find it until you run into a problem, especially when the documentation already told you everything was going to be just fine. Oh, and I couldn’t find a mention of this anywhere on the US Canon Web site.
I figured I’d try connect to the camera with the WFT Server which is purported to have a pseudo EOS Utility that works via a Web browser, but with a tiny LiveView window, no auto-focus and no automatic downloading of images, it’s a total waste of time.
Canon, I love you guys, you know that, but stop wasting your time developing crappy applications like the WFT Server on the camera, and dare I say it, DPP and ImageBrowser could go too, and just concentrate on supporting the drivers and critical utilities that your customers need to use your cameras! The Mac OS is important to the photography community. It always has been, so get your acts together!
OK, rant over, let’s move on…
Canon EOS 1D X Side View
Canon EOS 1D X Side View

Battery Pack LP-E4N

The 1D X also sports a new battery, the LP-E4N, though you can also use the LP-E4 that the previous 1 series bodies use. They are both 11.1V but the LP-E4N is 2450mAh compared to 2300mAh for the LP-E4. I had heard that the performance of the camera is reduced when using the older LP-E4 battery packs, but having scoured the Manual, the only reference to performance is on page 360, and it says “The use of a genuine Canon Battery Pack LP-E4N or LP-E4 is recommended. If you use any battery other than the Battery Pack LP-E4N or LP-E4, the camera’s full performance may not be attained or malfunction may result”. This suggests to me that there is no degrade in performance when using the LP-E4, and I have noticed none in my test shooting so far either.

Resolution

If you consider the 1D X an upgrade from the 1D Mark IV, then you basically gain 2 megapixels with the jump from 16 to 18. The 1D X is now supposed to be THE flagship in Canon’s DSLR line-up, and it’s a full frame camera, like the 1Ds Mark III, the previous flagship model, so I have to admit that I’m slightly disappointed by what is essentially a drop in resolution.
Canon EOS 1D X Front View
Canon EOS 1D X Front View
Of course, the 1D line is built for speed, and with a frame rate of 12 frames per second, or 14 fps in JPEG mode, it’s easy to see where the trade-off is being made here. Even with the increase in frame rate, Canon were still able to increase the image size by two megapixels over the 1D Mark IV and increase high ISO performance, so I can live with this drop.
Besides, I’ll be using the 5D Mark III or even the 1Ds Mark III, which I have not sold yet when I need maximum megapixels, or two weatherproofed bodies. I really want to maintain two 1 series bodies for the times when I need that rugged build and weather proofing, like when I’m sitting in a Zodiac getting drenched with sea spray in November and December this year.

Auto-Focus & Metering

The auto-focus on the 1D X has increased focus points over the 1D Mark IV, jumping from 45 points to 61 in the 1D X. The new auto-focus is almost the same as the 5D Mark III, which received a huge auto-focus upgrade compared to the nine point system in the 5D Mark II. Both the 1D X and 5D Mark III are 61-Point High Density Reticular auto-focus systems, with 41 cross-type AF points, but the major difference is that the 1D X has iTR, or Intelligent Tracking and Recognition, which the 5D Mark III doesn’t have.
Although the 1D X uses dual DIGIC 5+ image processors to process and pump those 12 frames per second through to the CF card, it uses a DIGIC 4 processor to power the EOS ISA (Intelligent Subject Analysis) which is a 100,000 pixel RGB Metering System. This is used to aid the AF system with Automatic Point Selection which improves the tracking system when using AI Servo. What this means is that basically, when you lock on to a subject in AI Servo mode, the camera uses the color information of your subject to track it across the frame, switching to other focus points as necessary. I was hoping that this would provide a magic bullet for some challenging situations, but that doesn’t appear to be the case, as we’ll see shortly.
Note that in AI Servo mode it’s not obvious at first, but for you to enable the camera to use all 61 focus points to track your subject away from the manually selected focus point that you use to obtain your initial focus, you have to select the 61 point automatic selection AF (bottom right in this diagram).
Canon EOS 1D X AF Modes
Canon EOS 1D X AF Modes
This is somewhat counter intuitive but although it’s called 61 point automatic selection auto focus, in AI Servo mode you still have the ability to move a focus single point around, and that is used to gain your initial focus. If you conversely select Single-point Spot AF, Single-point AF or one of the AF point expansion modes the camera will only use the points or groups of AF points selected, and even in AI Servo mode it will not shift to the other focus points if the subject moves away from the selected points or you recompose the image.
So, put simply to use AI Servo and have the camera track your subject around the frame, select 61-point automatic selection AF and focus with the center focus point, or move that focus point anywhere you like, and then half press the shutter button or use the back focus button to focus, and as long as you hold down the focus button, you can recompose shot or your subject can move and as long as they stay within the 61 focus point area, the camera will automatically track your subject around the frame.

AI Servo Focus Accuracy

I was always cautious of using AI Servo focusing full time, as I know some people that use the back focus button do. I never found AI Servo focusing to be quite as accurate as One Shot, and so shied away from it for anything other than moving subjects such as birds in flight. On my second day out with the 1D X though, I went somewhere that I know there’d be a good chance of seeing and photographing a Common Kingfisher.
If you’ve ever tried to photograph a Kingfisher you’ll know that they don’t hang around when moving from A to B, so I decided to shoot in AI Servo mode full time, although I could use the button the lens to toggle between One Shot and AI Servo if necessary. I could quickly tell though that the ability of the 1D X to attain accurate focus of stationary objects with AI Servo focusing was spot on.
Common Kingfisher - Stationary
Common Kingfisher – Stationary
This is probably helped by the 100,000 pixels RGB metering that we looked at earlier. The AF is no longer just relying on contrast information, it can actually see that there is a cobalt blue object amongst the green now. A few seconds after shooting this image though (above), the kingfisher took flight, and although I lost it with the narrow field of view of the 600mm lens, I only lost it for a second, and then caught up with the bird as it stopped to hover for a few seconds before rocketed off again.
In this next photo you can see the hovering Kingfisher, and this is something that I’ve never been able to capture before. Even if I see them do this for a second or so, the camera just takes too long searching for the subject. Now, I’m pretty sure I stopped focusing for a split second as I lost the kingfisher from within my finder, but despite the bird having moved towards me by a few meters, the auto-focus just snapped straight back in as soon as the kingfisher came into frame. It was beautiful to watch, from both an aesthetic perspective and technical one, and the focus is spot on, right on the head of the bird.
Common Kingfisher Hovering
Common Kingfisher Hovering
The bird was hovering for literally just a second or so, then it flew away over to another perch, and was again too fast for me to catch at its break-neck flight speed, but I bagged a shot that I’m pretty proud of here. I actually put together a four frame animated GIF that I posted on Google+, if you want to take a look. It’s quite impressive, if I do say so myself.
https://plus.google.com/u/0/102227359845636175866/posts/L1Hor91K5ny
Here’s one last shot of the Kingfisher before we move on. These are beautiful little birds and I’m pleased that the 1D X actually enabled me to get some shots that I actually like of these birds, for the first time.
Common Kingfisher
Common Kingfisher

AI Servo Tracking Performance

I had a chance to take the 1D X down to the river near to our apartment too, and there were a few cormorants fishing, then taking off, circling round up river, then having been swept back by the current, they’d take off again. This gave me a chance to check the settings that would help me to continue to track with a bird flying over water, which is always a problem because when sunlight hits the water, you get little sparkles of light and contrast that tend to steal the auto-focus from what would otherwise be a relatively easy to track subject. With a little trial and error I was able to confirm which AF settings worked best before hunger and sunburn forced me to leave in the middle of the afternoon.
I still have some experimenting to do, and of course, you’ll need to change these settings yourself based on each location you shoot in and experience as you use the camera, but AF Case 5, for erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction without any customization worked best for me with birds over water. I tried a lot of combinations, including increasing Acceleration/Deceleration Tracking from zero to 1 in Case 5, and I tried the other cases too, but generally the best settings for this situation was Case 5 with no adjustments.
Common Cormorant (f/8, 1/1600, ISO 800)
Common Cormorant (f/8, 1/1600, ISO 800)
Even using these settings though, if the cormorant flew over a patch of rough water with higher contrast, the focus would sometimes snap back to that, and I’d have to release the AF button on the back of the camera, ensure the bird was in the center of the frame again, and then refocus. Once I did that, the camera generally stayed with the subject again, so it seems that choppy water behind birds has not magically become a non-issue as far as my tests have shown to this point. Against a clear sky or less choppy water though, the AI Servo was relentless in tracking the bird with any and all of its 61 focus points.

No Illuminated Focus Point in AI Servo

There is one annoying thing that was fixed in the 1D Mark IV, but is currently regressed in the 1D X, and that is that the focus point that has focus is not illuminated as the subject moves around the frame. I really liked this functionality in the 1D Mark IV, but it’s gone again. The Canon Rumors Web site says it’s something to do with the red light affecting the exposure calculation, and that Canon may be working on a fix, but no details are available as of June 2012.

ISO Tests

OK, so let’s take a look at the insane high ISO performance of the 1D X. First, here is a range of images from ISO 800 through to 204800 in full stop increments. I shot from ISO 50 upwards, but ISO’s 50 through 800 are identical, with no grain, so it really wasn’t worth sharing the first four images. Click on thumbnails and navigate back and forth with your mouse or keyboard arrow keys.


1DX ISO 800
1DX ISO 800

1DX ISO 1600
1DX ISO 1600

1DX ISO 3200
1DX ISO 3200

1DX ISO 6400
1DX ISO 6400

1DX ISO 12800
1DX ISO 12800

1DX ISO 25600
1DX ISO 25600

1DX ISO 51200
1DX ISO 51200

1DX ISO 102400
1DX ISO 102400

1DX ISO 204800
1DX ISO 204800

You can see from these examples that if you were shooting for the Web, you could go as high as ISO 51200 without worrying very much about ISO at all. Here though is a series of 100% crops of part of the main sunflower, also including the out of focus sunflower in the background. I included this second flower, because the out of focus bokeh areas of an image can often show more grain than the in focus area.
To view this at 100% you’ll need to open your browser window up as to 1280 pixels or wider, and click on a thumbnail, then navigate back and forth with your mouse or keyboard arrow keys. If you don’t open your browser window wide enough, the blog will automatically reduce the size to fit your screen. You’ll still be able to see the grain, but not as well.


ISO 800 @ 100%
ISO 800 @ 100%

ISO 1600 @ 100%
ISO 1600 @ 100%

ISO 3200 @ 100%
ISO 3200 @ 100%

ISO 6400 @ 100%
ISO 6400 @ 100%

ISO 12800 @ 100%
ISO 12800 @ 100%

ISO 25600 @ 100%
ISO 25600 @ 100%

ISO 51200 @ 100%
ISO 51200 @ 100%

ISO 102400 @ 100%
ISO 102400 @ 100%

ISO 204800 @ 100%
ISO 204800 @ 100%

You might recall from my 5D Mark III review that based on my tests, I made ISO 12800 the highest ISO that I would go to without thinking about grain at all. I also set this as the ISO that my 5D Mark III will go to when using the Auto ISO mode. At a push though, I told you that I’d go to ISO 25600 on the 5D3, with the understanding that I’d have to deal with a bit of grain.
To save going back to the 5D Mark III review to check, and also so that we can do a direct comparison, I also shot the sunflowers with the 5D Mark III, so here are the 100% crops from the 5D Mark III from ISO 800 to 102400. Note that the 5D Mark III has one stop less ISO than the 1D X, which is why we can’t compare ISO 204800.


5D3 ISO 800 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 800 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 1600 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 1600 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 3200 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 3200 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 6400 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 6400 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 12800 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 12800 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 25600 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 25600 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 51200 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 51200 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 102400 @100%
5D3 ISO 102400 @100%

OK, so after that reminder of the 5D Mark III ISO performance, let’s take a look at one last set of ISO images. It’s the same shots that we just looked at, but I’m going to place the ISOs from 12800 upwards from both cameras right next to each other, so that you can flick through them on screen, to see a direct comparison. It seems though that the 1D X is comparable to one stop lower ISO on the 5D Mark III, so I’m going to start with the 1D X ISO 12800 image, so that you’ll also be able to compare the 5D Mark III’s ISO 12800 image directly to the 1D X’s ISO 25600 and so on.


1DX ISO 12800 @ 100%
1DX ISO 12800 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 12800 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 12800 @ 100%

1DX ISO 25600 @ 100%
1DX ISO 25600 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 25600 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 25600 @ 100%

1DX ISO 51200 @ 100%
1DX ISO 51200 @ 100%

5D3 ISO 51200 @ 100%
5D3 ISO 51200 @ 100%

1DX ISO 102400 100%
1DX ISO 102400 100%

5D3 ISO 102400 @100%
5D3 ISO 102400 @100%

1DX ISO 204800 100%
1DX ISO 204800 100%

As you can see, the 1D X is perhaps even slightly better than one stop less ISO on the 5D Mark III up to 102400, but I think ISO 204800 on the 1D X is actually quite a lot better than 102400, the highest ISO on the 5D Mark III. Of course, this doesn’t mean the 5D Mark III ISO performance is bad. This is just the trade-off for the extra four megapixels, and both cameras are still amazing in the high ISOs. This is a dream compared to what we had just a generation of cameras ago, and that was a revelation a few years ago too. Things are certainly moving forward quickly. These cameras can now virtually see in the dark!
Based on these results, I’ve set the Auto-ISO range on my 1D X to a maximum of 25600, which is where I’ll go without worrying about grain. I would go to 51200 at a push too, but the expanded ISOs 102400 and especially 204800 are probably best avoided. This is of course why Canon set these as Expanded ISOs, which you have to enable before you can use. With both the 5D Mark III and 1D X they seem to have the limit exactly where it should be.


Canon EOS 1D X
Canon EOS 1D X

Canon EOS 1D X
Canon EOS 1D X

Conclusion

OK, so these are the main points that I’ve come across so far. I can live with the resolution for the frame-rate and high ISO performance trade-off . I was expecting a larger leap forward in the AI Servo tracking performance, but I’m very happy with the accuracy of the AI Servo focusing when it locks on. For my cormorant tests I was working in very high contrast conditions, and with flowing water in the background, which has always been very tricky. Considering this, it performed OK, though I had hoped for a little more.
As I use the camera more I’ll update you in this area, hopefully with good news that it’s much better in some other situations, but I was incredibly happy with how the 1D X handled the Kingfisher shoot though, so there really is not anything to worry about here, but I was a little more optimistic for some of the more challenging conditions.
All in all though, I am happy with the camera. Is it perfect? Absolutely not. Is it close? Absolutely! It’s a beautiful piece of engineering, and I’m looking forward very much to taking it down to Antarctica for six weeks later this year. I’ll be sharing my photos when I get back of course, and that will probably be a good time to update you on the AI Servo too, if I haven’t already done so.
UPDATE: By the way, for those that weren’t aware of this, Canon didn’t update the 1D X firmware to allow f/8.0 focusing. The 600mm f/4 lens for example does not auto-focus with the 2X Extender fitted. On the brighter side though, the 1D X does perform pretty well with the 600mm and 2X Extender, probably due to the larger photodiodes and reduced resolution over the 21MP bodies. Here’s a 100% crop of a bull-frog. This is straight out of camera with Lightroom 4 default processing. It’s not as sharp as I’d like but this is certainly bordering on usable. With a bit of Clarity and a little additional sharpening this would brush up OK.
Bullfrog
Bullfrog

End Notes

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sourse http://blog.martinbaileyphotography.com/2012/06/27/podcast-341-canon-eos-1d-x-digital-slr-review/